Sources + Definitions

Data Sources

Definitions

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

A
Age

16 + Years Old. An estimate of the population that is of working age for statistical purposes. Generally, employment statistics reported by the BLS assume that civilian, non-institutionalized individuals 16 years of age or more comprise working age population.

25-54 Years Old. This age group comprises the segment of the population that is of prime working age in BLS employment statistics.

American Community Survey (ACS)

ACS is an ongoing survey that provides data every year as a supplement to the decennial census. ACS produces one-year, three-year, and five-year estimates. One year estimates represent 12 months of collected data for areas with a population of 65,000 or more. Three year estimates collect 36 months of data from areas with a population of 20,000 or more. Five year estimates collect 60 months of data for all areas.

Arts, Humanities and Other

The Arts, Humanities and Other category for field of degree includes the following: literature and languages, English, foreign language and literature, Spanish, liberal arts, history philosophy, theology, American history, visual and performing arts interior design, dance, voice communications, mass communications, journalism, public relations, other public administration, pre-law, kinesiology.

E
Establishments

An establishment is a single physical location at which business is conducted or where services or industrial operation are performed. It is not necessarily identical with a company or enterprise, which may consist of one establishment or more. When two or more activities are conducted at a single location under a single ownership, all activities are generally grouped together as a single establishment and classified on the basis of its major activity. Establishment counts represent the number of locations with paid employees. (A separate data item, nonemployer establishments, provides the number of establishments without paid employees, such as self-employed individuals and sole proprietorships.)

F
Federal Civilian

The term civilian employee means all appointive positions in an executive agency (5 U.S.C. 105). It does not refer to private contractors hired by the agencies. (5 CFR 792.210)

Federal Military

Federal Military is defined as the Armed forces of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. The uniformed services means the armed forces, the commissioned corps of the Public Health Service, and the commissioned corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (5 USC 2101).

G
GDP by Industry

Gross domestic product (GDP) provides important information on the value of goods and services produced by labor and property located in a geographic area during a period of time. It is also one key measure of income flows to factors of production, like labor and capital. After adjustment for inflation it tells us how economic output is growing (or not) over time. It also provides key information on the industrial mix of regions, so that we know what sectors are larger or smaller. (See also Industry)

I
Industry

Industry Total. Aggregate total including all industries.

Natural Resources & Mining. The Natural Resources and Mining supersector is part of the goods-producing industries. The natural resources and mining supersector consists of the following sectors: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting (NAICS 11); Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 21).

Construction. The Construction sector (NAICS 23) comprises establishments primarily engaged in the construction of buildings or engineering projects (e.g., highways and utility systems). Establishments primarily engaged in the preparation of sites for new construction and establishments primarily engaged in subdividing land for sale as building sites also are included in this sector.

Manufacturing. The Manufacturing sector (NAICS 31-33) comprises establishments engaged in the mechanical, physical, or chemical transformation of materials, substances, or components into new products. Establishments in the Manufacturing sector are often described as plants, factories, or mills and characteristically use power-driven machines and materials-handling equipment.

Trade, Transportation & Utilities. The Trade, Transportation, and Utilities supersector is part of the service-providing industries. The trade, transportation, and utilities supersector consists of these four sectors: Wholesale Trade (NAICS 42), Retail Trade (NAICS 44-45), Transportation and Warehousing (NAICS 48-49), and Utilities (NAICS 22).

Information. The information sector (NAICS 51) comprises establishments engaged in the following processes: (a) producing and distributing information and cultural products, (b) providing the means to transmit or distribute these products as well as data or communications, and (c) processing data. The main components of this sector are the publishing industries, including software publishing, and both traditional publishing and publishing exclusively on the Internet; the motion picture and sound recording industries; the broadcasting industries, including traditional broadcasting and those broadcasting exclusively over the Internet; the telecommunications industries; Web search portals, data processing industries, and the information services industries.

Financial Activities. The financial activities supersector is part of the service-providing industries. The financial activities supersector consists of: Finance and Insurance (NAICS 52) and Real Estate and Rental and Leasing (NAICS 53). The Finance and Insurance sector comprises establishments primarily engaged in financial transactions (transactions involving the creation, liquidation, or change in ownership of financial assets) and/or in facilitating financial transactions. The Real Estate and Rental and Leasing sector comprises establishments primarily engaged in renting, leasing, or otherwise allowing the use of tangible or intangible assets, and establishments providing related services.

Professional & Business Services. The professional and business services supersector is part of the service-providing industries. The professional and business services supersector consists of these sectors: Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services (NAICS 54); Management of Companies and Enterprises (NAICS 55); and Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services (NAICS 56).

Education & Health. The education and health services supersector is part of the service-providing industries. The education and health services supersector consists of these two sectors: Educational Services (NAICS 61) and Health Care and Social Assistance (NAICS 62).

Leisure & Hospitality. The leisure and hospitality supersector is part of the service-providing industries. The leisure and hospitality supersector consists of these two sectors: Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation (NAICS 71) and Accommodation and Food Services (NAICS 72).

Other Services. Other Services (except Public Administration), NAICS 81, comprises establishments engaged in providing services not specifically provided for elsewhere in the classification system. Establishments in this sector are primarily engaged in activities, such as equipment and machinery repairing, promoting or administering religious activities, grant making, advocacy, and providing dry cleaning and laundry services, personal care services, death care services, pet care services, photofinishing services, temporary parking services, and dating services.

Government. Government comprises federal, state, and local government employees including state and local education. Most sources of employment data list federal civilian employees but not armed forces employees.

J
Jobs in Leisure and Arts

This represents the number of workers per 10,000 residents in the arts, entertainment and recreation industry category (NAICS 71). The data come from the County Business Patterns as well as Nonemployer Statistics. The Nonemployer Statistics are used to capture self-employed persons in the arts, entertainment, and recreation categories that are not reflected in the County Business Patterns.

L
Labor Force Participation Rate

The labor force participation rate is calculated by dividing the total number of people in the labor force by the total population. The labor force includes both the employed and the unemployed who are actively seeking work.

M
Margin of Error

A margin of error is the difference between an estimate and its upper or lower confidence bounds. Confidence bounds can be created by adding the margin of error to the estimate (for an upper bound) and subtracting the margin of error from the estimate (for a lower bound). All published margins of error for the American Community Survey are based on a 90 percent confidence level.

Median Home Price

Median home price represents the sale price of existing single-family homes for which half the homes sold for more and half for less.

Median Income

The median divides the income distribution into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the median income and one-half above the median.

Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)

A metropolitan statistical area (MSA) delineates a local labor market, using counties as the basic building blocks. It consists of a core county (or counties) which contain a large population concentration (urbanized area or city), along with contiguous counties that share a high degree of economic integration with the core. Economic integration is measured by flows of residents commuting to work. Each metropolitan statistical area must contain an urbanized area with at least 50,000 residents.

Micropolitan Statistical Area
A micropolitan statistical area must have at least one urban cluster of at least 10,000, but less than 50,000 inhabitants.

N
North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)

The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is an industry classification system designed to group business establishments based on the similarity of their production processes. It is used by federal statistical agencies in collecting, analyzing, and publishing information on businesses. It was adopted in 1997 to replace the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system and was developed to facilitate comparability for business statistics among the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.

O
Occupational Wages

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics collects survey data on wages by occupation and industry and reports this data annually as Occupational Employment Statistics (OES). The OES data include detailed employment and wage estimates for over 800 occupations and industries. (See Occupations)

Occupations

Occupational employment and wage data are grouped by the Standard Occupational Classification System. Here are the major occupational groups with a brief description:

11 - Management. This major group consists of managers who plan, direct, and coordinate the activities of establishments in any occupational (total private/ or total nonfarm?) group. This includes managers of: operations, marketing, public relations, human resources, advertising, finance, hotels, restaurants, etc.

13 - Business and Financial Operations. This major group consists of occupations engaged in business and financial occupations. Examples include financial specialists, management and budget analysts, event planners, agents, buyers, claims adjusters, real estate assessors, human resources specialists, and accountants.

15 - Computer and Mathematical. This major group comprises occupations in computer and mathematical categories. Examples include computer programmers, research scientists, network/database administrators, mathematicians, statisticians, software/web developers, and computer/ technical support specialists.

17 - Architecture and Engineering. This major group consists of occupations in Architectural and Engineering categories. Examples include architects, landscape architects, surveyors, cartographers, engineers, and drafters.

19 - Life, Physical, and Social Science. This major group consists of Life, Physical and Social Science Occupations such as biologists, ecologists, zoologists, biochemists, conservation/plant/soil scientists, and foresters.

21 - Community and Social Service. This major group consists of Community and Social Service occupations such as mental health counselors, social workers, guidance counselors, substance abuse counselors, clergy, health educators, probation officers, and other social service specialists.

23 - Legal. This major group consists of occupations in Legal professions. Examples include lawyers, legal assistants, paralegals, law clerks, judges, court reporters, and title examiners.

25 - Education, Training, and Library. This major group consists of Education, Training and Library and related occupations. Examples include: elementary, middle, secondary and post-secondary teachers, adult educators, teaching assistants, librarians, curators, and archivists.

27 - Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media. This major group consists of Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media occupations. Examples include fine artists, animators, graphic/floral/interior designers, multimedia artists, set/exhibit designers, and art directors.

29 - Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations. This major group consists of Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations. Examples include physicians, nurses, veterinarians, physical/occupational/recreational therapists, nutritionists, EMTs, and laboratory technicians.

31 - Healthcare Support. This major group consists of Healthcare Support occupations. Examples include medical/dental/veterinary assistants, massage therapists, home health aides, veterinary assistances, and other healthcare support workers.

33 - Protective Service. This major group consists of Protective Service occupations. Examples include police officers, firefighters, security guards, lifeguards, ski patrol workers, animal control workers, game wardens, transportation security screeners, and other recreational protective service workers.

35 - Food Preparation and Serving Related. This major group consists of Food Preparation and Serving Related occupations. Examples include cooks, bartenders, food service workers, caterers, dishwashers, host/ hostesses and first line-supervisors of food preparation, and serving related occupations.

37 - Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance. This major group consists of Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance occupations. Examples include janitorial workers, housekeepers, cleaners, building cleaning workers, landscapers, pest control workers, tree trimmers and pruners, and other maintenance workers.

39 - Personal Care and Service. This major group consists of Personal Care and Service related occupations. Examples include hairstylists, fitness trainers, ushers, childcare worker/nannies, recreation workers, travel/wilderness/river raft/kayak guides, nonfarm animal caretaker/trainers, and other personal care and service workers.

41 - Sales and Related. This major group consists of Sales and Related occupations. Examples include First line supervisors of retail and non-retail sales workers, cashiers, gaming/ casino change persons and booth cashiers, manufacturing, real estate, and other sales professions.

43 - Office and Administrative Support. This major group consists of Office and Administrative Support occupations. Examples include financial, billing, file and mail clerks, bookkeepers, tellers, receptionists, administrative assistants, data entry processors, library assistants, and legal secretaries.

45 - Farming, Fishing, and Forestry. This major group consists of Farming, Fishing and Forestry and related occupations. Examples include farm, greenhouse, fishing and forestry workers, agricultural and inspection workers, loggers, equipment operators, and animal breeders.

47 - Construction and Extraction. This major group consists of Construction and Extraction related occupations. Examples include construction trade and extraction workers, masons, carpenters, electricians, pipefitters, building inspectors, construction and mining equipment repairers, and electronics installers.

49 - Installation, Maintenance, and Repair. This major group consists of Installation, Maintenance and Repair related occupations. Examples include mechanics, installers and repairers of computer and automated equipment, office machines, radio and cellular towers and other commercial and industrial equipment repair workers.

51 - Production. This major group consists of Production workers across numerous occupations. Examples include manufacturing workers such as assemblers, machinists, textile workers, woodworkers, and plant operators. It also includes production workers in other sectors such as arts, education and accommodations such as photo processors, welders, printing workers, bakers, and butchers.

53 - Transportation and Material Moving. This major group consists of Transportation and Material Moving occupations such as drivers of trucks, buses, taxis, ambulances. It also includes workers engaged in transportation broadly defined such as material movers, heavy tractor trailer truck drivers, air traffic controllers, pilots, flight attendants, shipping engineers, bridge and lock tenders, and railway workers.

P
Patents

The rate of patents per 10,000 workers is computed from the total number of utility patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office and total nonfarm employment reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Current Employment Statistics (CES) program. Utility patents are issued for the invention of a “new process, machine, manufacture or composition of matter” and grants the owner exclusive right to sell the invention for a period of up to 20 years. Utility patents are distinguished from others by providing some specific, substantial, and credible utility.

Poverty Rate

Poverty rates are from U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey (ACS) three-year estimates. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, a family is considered below the poverty level if their annual household income falls below a threshold that is based on annual income, age, and family size. For example, the poverty threshold for a family of five with three related children under 18 years in 2011 was $26,844.

S
State and Local Government Employees

This category includes all persons paid for personal services performed in the indicated pay period, including any persons in a paid leave status. Employees who have multiple responsibilities are reported once at the functional classification which is their primary responsibility. Contractors and their employees are excluded.

T
Total Nonfarm (Employment)

This category includes wage and salary employment for all sectors. Farm employment, private household employment, and self-employment are excluded.

Total Private (Employment)

This category includes employees of private establishments within 13 major industry sectors from which Current Employment Survey data are collected. This category represents total nonfarm employment less government employment.

W
Wage Distribution

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics collects survey data on wages by occupation and industry and reports this data annually as their Occupational Employment Statistics (OES). The OES data includes detailed employment and wage data for over 800 occupations and industries. Wages are compensation received from working and do not include fringe benefits or other sources of income such as interest, bonuses, dividends, and rents.

Wages

Wages are compensation received from working and do not include fringe benefits or other sources of income such as interest, bonuses, dividends, and rents.

Sources + Abbreviations

AAA : American Automobile Association

ADHS : Arizona Department of Health Services

ADOA : Arizona Department of Administration, Office of Employment and Population Statistics

ADOR : Arizona Department of Revenue

ADOT : Arizona Department of Transportation

ARMLS : Arizona Regional Multiple Listing Service

ASPB : Arizona State Parks Board

BEA : Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce

BLS : Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor

Census C-40 : U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce

EBRC : Economic and Business Research Center, The University of Arizona

Micropolitan SA : A micropolitan statistical area must have at least one urban cluster of at least 10,000, but less than 50,000 inhabitants.

MSA : A Metropolitan Statistical Area must have at least one core urbanized area of at least 50,000 inhabitants.

PSHIA : Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport

SAAR : Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

TAR : Tucson Association of Realtors

U.S. Bankruptcy Court: District of Arizona

USCBP : U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security

BTS : Bureau of Transportation Statistics, U.S. Department of Transportation

NPS : National Park Service

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